How I signed Police invitation letter at gunpoint — Busola Dakolo

Busola, singer Timi Dakolo's wife.
Busola, singer Timi Dakolo's wife.
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Busola, photographer and wife of popular singer, Timi Dakolo, has alleged that policemen threatened her with a gun and forced her to sign a letter accusing her and her husband of criminal conspiracy.

The incident reportedly happened three weeks after she had filed a rape allegation against the Senior Pastor of Commonwealth of Zion Assembly, Biodun Fatoyinbo.

“The charges against the Dakolos were brought by a special police branch in a counter-case filed by COZA, despite investigations stalling on the initial case,” The UK Guardian has reported.

Busola had accused Fatoyinbo of sexually assaulting her in her mother’s house about 20 years ago when she was a teenager and a minor.

She said the pastor repeated the act at least once thereafter.

The incident led to the picketing of COZA by human rights activists, sequel to which Fatoyinbo temporarily stepped down.

The pastor denied Busola’s claims, saying, “Even as an unbeliever, I did not rape anybody.”

Fatoyinbo resumed his duties at COZA after a month of announcing his decision to step down.

In an interview with The UK Guardian, Mrs. Dakolo said on the day of her encounter with the policemen who she said trailed her to her home in a silver Toyota and white minibus with tinted glass, she was asked to sign a letter.

She noted that neither vehicles had any Police markings.

According to Dakolo, a man appeared and told her to get out of the car, get into the bus and speak to his boss. A request she claimed to have rejected.

Busola said that was when three men got out of the minibus and walked towards her.

“One was holding a gun, and I noticed a second one holding a letter.

“They told me they were from IG’s (Inspector-General of Police) office in Abuja and that I needed to sign the letter and acknowledge it,” she said.

The letter purportedly contained allegations of criminal conspiracy, falsehood, mischief and threat to life.

The UK Guardian did not claim to have spoken with any Police authority over the incidence. Rather, it stated, “In response to condemnation of the delivery of the Dakolos’ letters, the Nigerian Police Force put out a statement saying: ‘A Police invitation letter is not synonymous with a warrant of arrest, and must not be construed to be one.

“Rather, it is a polite investigative tool used in eliciting information voluntarily from parties to aid police investigations.’”

The medium added that the charges against the Dakolos were brought by “a special Police branch in a counter-case filed by Coza, despite investigations stalling on the initial case.”

(TPM)

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